NOMAD is For Sale

Alright guys, it’s been a fun ride.  Over 5 years of playing on the ocean.  That said, it’s time.  I’m heading back to civilization for a few years, starting a business.  I’ll be back, but for now the money is better off invested somewhere it will grow.

Asking price is $165,000 in Panama.  As is.  All spares, utensils, tools, generator and 11′ AB aluminum dinghy with 15HP Yamaha Enduro 2 stroke included.  Not included is personal stuff, fishing gear, etc.

 

Chicks dig this boat 🙂

 

S/V NOMAD is For Sale (Lagoon 380)

Look at the table, not the ladies

"How to Overtake Other Boats"

“How to Overtake Other Boats”

The beaching of NOMAD

The beaching of NOMAD

Holiday Madness

Holiday Madness

Griffin Filters

Griffin Filters

Puffer Dan in the captain's chair

Puffer Dan in the captain’s chair

New A/C D/C Panel, bilge pump switches, water level guage

New A/C D/C Panel, bilge pump switches, water level guage

Lagoon 380Fuel Tanks w/Inspection Port

Lagoon 380Fuel Tanks w/Inspection Port

Lagoon 380 Dinghy Davit System

Lagoon 380 Dinghy Davit System

Lagoon 380 Seating Rearview

Lagoon 380 Seating Rearview

 

S/V NOMAD is a thoughtfully upgraded 2000 Lagoon 380 Owner’s Version (3 cabins and a large walk-in shower – 2 x queen beds and 1 x twin).  She has twin Volvo Penta 2030’s attached to Volvo Penta SD120 saildrives (will both be rebuilt before sale).  Over the last 5 years I’ve put over $50,000 into her, most of it in 2015 (when she went a major refit).  And while that sounds like alot, really in boat bucks it goes fast.

She’s currently out of the water in Shelter Bay Marina in Colon, Panama.  She’s checked on every two weeks, and I receive both pictures and updates.

For one year we used NOMAD as a OWNER-RUN charter vehicle.  Which means keeping her in shape was a priority and we had the money to do it properly.

This is by no means a comprehensive list.  Most of what I’ve installed over the last 5 years I’ve forgotten about.  There is, included in this sale, $5-6,000 is spares (electrical, mechanical, ropes, most of an engine, a saildrive, spare props, etc)

Engines/Saildrives

  • Port VP 2030 5600 hours, recently rebuilt top end, new head gasket, over the last 5 years nearly every part has been replaced, except for the bottom end.
  • Starboard VP 2030 2200 hours, recently replaced (2016).  Most of the old engine is under the owner’s bunk for spares, in addition to most of a saildrive (also for parts).
  • The VP 2030 is built on a Perkins block and is a solid engine.  They are simple, non-turbo, diesels.  Very easy to work on and the engine compartments are large and provide full 360 degree access.
  • 2 x MAX-Prop 3-bladed folding prop.  These are $3K new and in great shape.
  • Two turbine fuel filters (new 2015), and all new fuel lines and fuel pressure gauges.
  • Both fuel tanks were pulled, polished, and large inspection ports welded into the top.  This is a major upgrade and a crap job to do.
  • Both exhaust elbows were replaced with stainless ones that won’t corrode.
  • Alternators have been replaced multiple times.
  • LED lights installed for nighttime engine work (engines seem to always need work at night).
  • Engine hatch seals replaced with high-quality industrial seals (2015).
  • All sound and heat insulation in engine compartments replaced in 2015.
  • New engine compartment fans 2015.
  • New exhaust lines 2016.

Electronics

  • Garmin 741 XS 36 mile radar, depth sounder (will hold bottom to 300 meters, plus), and navigation (new 2015).
  • AIS (Vesper stand-aone with WiFi) 2015
  • New electrical panel (Paneltronics) and all wiring professionally done 2015.  This job is a bear.
  • New engine wiring (from engine to panel) in 2015
  • Marine ICOM SSB (I think it’s the 710). These aren’t cheap.
  • 6 X New Trojan 6V batteries (2018)
  • 800 Watts of solar correctly wired to two separate MPPT controllers new (2015, 2017).  Quiet and reliable power.
  • 1100 W Lorans (I think) windlass, with new solenoid (and two spares)
  • All gauges replaced 2015 (including fuel and water)
  • New 2015 Horizon VHF with remote station in cockpit.
  • New 2015 Kenwood Marine bluetooth radio.
  • A large amount of wiring, most pumps, etc replaced
  • New in 2014 Raymarine wind, depth, and autopilot.
  • NEW 12V air cooled Danfoss 50 fridge w/freezer evaporator plate.
  • ADDITIONAL, under-bunk cold plate 12V freezer.  This is a HUGE upgrade.

Sails

  • New fully battened main in 2017.  This sail is SO much better than the original.  In fact, it’s so much heavier that we had to add room to the sailbag to fit it.  It moves us at 50% of windspeed or better. On our sail to Cuba we averaged 9.8 knots.  Really.
  • New Cruising Code Zero on ProFurl NEX roller furling system (aka Screecher).  4 oz Dacron.  From 60 degrees back, this sail is significantly better than the genoa and can be used in apparent wind speeds up to 25 knots.  This sail is my favorite addition to the boat and my only regret is that I didn’t do it sooner.  Can be used in full downwind situations too, if the apparent wind is strong enough, buy running the sail across the bow of the boat.
  • Original gennaker, good for light winds, or DDW on roller furling system. Can move the boat, but generally prefer the CCZ.

 

Ground Tackle

  • 80M of galvanized 5/16″ G4 chain.  Has a higher load rating than 3/8″ G3 and less weight.  New in 2016.  New gypsy at the same time.
  • Additional 30M of rode shackled to chain with bitter end shackled off (you only make this mistake once).
  • Main anchor is Manson Supreme 60 pounds.  New 2016.  With 3x scope, the boat has never, ever, pulled anchor. To be clear, 3X scope is minimum and I’ve only used this in very tight anchorages.
  • Secondary anchor is 40 pound Delta, almost new and only used when in a two-anchor scenario.
  • Stern anchor is Fortress, guess is 30 pounds.
  • Two dinghy anchors and a kayak anchor on short piece of chain shackled to (more than enough) rode.

 

Structural Upgrades

This Lagoon 380 has had a few upgrades that dramatically increase it’s usefulness and useable area.

  • Custom fiberglass dodger, lipped for rain-catching (and piped into water tank).  Cost of $3,000
  • Custom rear arch (high quality 316 stainless tube)where solar sits, for optimal non-shaded sun-catching
  • On rear arch is a seat that spans between the hulls.  You can sail from this spot with the autopilot (I do) as it allows for a great line of sight.  Also a prime spot to sit when trolling.
  • Extending over the rear of the boat is a custom dinghy lift, which allows for a longer dinghy (10′ is the max length for a dinghy between the hulls).  New ropes here, new hardware, all 316 Stainless. You can walk in the dinghy when it’s raised and it allows the dinghy to be raised to the height of the dodger, making sailing in following seas significantly less dangerous.
  • See pics on all of this…

 

Other

  • 11′ AB Alumina dinghy. New 2016
  • Barely broken in Yamaha Enduro 15 HP 2 stroke.  These are the standard for low-maintenance, high-reliability engines.
  • New in 2015 Honda 2000 generator.  Just in case.
  • Spectra Watermaker (rebuilt by Spectra in 2017).  In the Cape Horn Extreme setup.  It’s the gold standard for 12V watermakers.
  • Two custom Teak Tables.  Cost of $1000 each.  One is in the cockpit for eating, the other is attached to the arch for cleaning fish.
  • All upholstery NEW.
  • Spare everything.  Really.  And more.
  • Tools.  Lots. Spares.

 

I know I’m missing a ton of stuff.  I simply can’t tell you how much I’ve put into this boat.  It was my home for 5 years of ridiculously beautiful, life-changing fun and adventure.  This is my baby.  The day I sell it will be a very, very hard day.  That said, shoot me an email which is firstname.lastname@gmail.com if you’re interested.

I will be back on the boat in January and hope to sell it then.  Please don’t tire kick.  I simply don’t have the time.

My first name is Nathan and last is Niehuus.

 

 

 

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Family Fun, Sailing in San Blas

A boat-natural

A boat-natural

I have one engine that is worrying me and another with a fuel issue.  It’s not a great situation, but I manage it doesn’t’ affect where we go and what we do. It just changes the order of some of the activities as we need to use wind power more than diesel power now.  Not a biggie, it is after all, a sailboat.  So we picked the days that would work for a 1/2 day dragging lures and then planned the rest of our trip (loosely) around weather.

Snorkeling in San Blas on NOMAD

Snorkeling in San Blas on NOMAD

Our first day was a bit of snorkeling, a smoked chicken, and then some sushi (two kinds of tuna in this one).  Then there was the champagne for the campaign.  Then a bit of Marissa’s margaritas (now called Marissaritas). Then it was time for sleep – an early wakeup the next day to pull lures and then explore Kuna villages.  We woke early and got a good start, but had a 2 knot current on our nose and I couldn’t get out of it.  So our progress was slow, almost as slow as the fish bite.

Sushi on NOMAD

Sushi on NOMAD

After a strikeout on the first fishing attempt we pulled back behind the islands and hung out with one of my favorite Kuna families. We swam and walked around the beaches and then came back to another excellent meal and even better drinks. The next morning we took a long dinghy ride out to a protected area where the snorkeling is easy and the coral abundant. There we did some kicking around – we saw a couple of lobster, I saw rays and a nice Dog Snapper and a Cubera Snapper.  The snapper were too smart for me, so we settled on three types of conch for conch fritters.

Hammock time on NOMAD

Hammock time on NOMAD

Then we came back to the boat and then our Kuna friends brought us some lobster and some crab.  Needless to say, we ate very well.  Then we had a couple of drinks and sat around watching the fish under the green light.  The next morning was a rainy one, so we played games and drank coffee until late morning, when the rain cleared.

After a bit of kicking around and some food we moved the boat again, this time not all that far.  Once again we were the only boat in the anchorage – but that wasn’t what made this evening cool.  What made this evening cool was that we anchored very close to a rip that was bringing water from outside the reef in – and with it bait and fish.  We watched a school of Bonita pound bait on the surface and then witnessed some mackerel do the same and then when we saw the Tarpon join in on the action – Mike and I agreed we should take a little dinghy trip.  We packed a couple of trolling rods and a spinning reel and off we went in the dinghy. As the swell was small and the period long – we took the dinghy out in the open water and pulled a couple of lures through the rip.

Dinghy fishing

Dinghy fishing

After about 20 minutes of trolling Mike had a nice fish on and the fight began.  The fish would take a little line, then run to us, then fight and take line again.  More than once we thought we lost him (he ran to us) and more than once he pulled line off the reel. But eventually we got him up next to the dinghy, at which point we both realized we hadn’t really planned for anything other than a) catch and release or b) a football tuna.  This was a pretty good-sized King Mackerel, who was putting up a decent fight and who had plenty of teeth which could do plenty of damage to both dinghy and/or feet.  Eventually Mike pulled up the Mackerel by the line and I pulled him up by the tail and we got him in the dinghy – but not before he gave us a shower. Once in the dinghy we had a moment of ‘what now’ and then used the anchor to give him a bonk.  Done deal.  Fish in boat, fisherman happy and exchanging high-fives.  Plenty of fish for fish tacos and sushi.

Mike's King

Mike’s King

Then we began working our way back to the boat, where I got a strike on my rod.  There was a brief fight and then we had a Barracuda up next to the dingy.  I managed to (eventually) get him unhooked and released without puncturing the dinghy. Then it was nearly dark and the wind increased dramatically.  We made it back to the boat in the choppy dark, where we took pictures and then cleaned the fish.  I was out early that night, again we were waking up a little early to drag lures outside the island.

The welcoming committee

The welcoming committee

The next morning we pointed the boat North and headed out of the islands toward open water.  As soon as we dropped the lures we hooked a Spanish Mackerel, boated him, unhooked him, and released him.  Ten minutes later Mike was reeling in another lure (to check it) and a Spanish Mackerel shot no less than 10 feet out of the water while we all watched him.  It really was an amazing sight – seeing a fish jump that high out of the water.  He resembled a rocket more than a fish.  Very, very cool.

We saw birds working and smaller schools of Blackfin and Bonita, but nothing that got our blood pumping or made the reels scream.  Alas.  That afternoon we pulled behind Chichime and dropped our anchor.  There we ate another excellent meal and I took a much-needed rest.  Later we walked around Chichime and did a bit more Mola shopping and then retired to the boat for our last supper.  First, though, we cleaned 3 different species of conch.  I don’t want to brag here – but Marissa can make some world-class Conch Fritters.  World class.

King conch cleaning on NOMAD

King conch cleaning on NOMAD

The conch-cleaning operation

The conch-cleaning operation

Then there was more champagne and more Marissaritas.  Then we dropped in the green light and watched the fish congregate around NOMAD. There were several Spotted Eagle Rays in the area and eventually the temptation was too much – so I dove in and swam with them and the other baitfish under NOMAD.  I enjoy night diving, but it’s always easier after a glass of Rum (or two).  Anyways, I did manage to hang with the Spotted Eagle Ray for a bit and even got some footage.  It didn’t take long before most of the crew was in the water with us.  Then, suddenly, it was late and we were exhausted.

Spotted Eagle Rays at night

Spotted Eagle Rays at night

The next morning came early, and before we knew it our new freinds were off.  Moving guests from the ‘client’ category to the ‘friend’ category is one of the pleasures of this business, and I’m very happy to say we were successful in this again.

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